That’s it, that’s the defining phrase of 2021. The world has witnessed the power of words, of disinformation, of hashtags, or praising cult-like leaders since the late 2000’s. The shooting in Kenosha was carried out by a white, cis-male teenager who attended a Donald Trump rally in January. Seven months’ worth of racist and violent calls to action via tweets, campaign, and official White House videos, and Facebook posts by President Trump and his supporters later, we not only see a brazen shooting at a protest, but other attacks on minorities. …


The June 22 issue of The New Yorker featured a heart-wrenching piece by The New Jim Crow author, Michelle Alexander. Her piece, “The Trayvon Generation” highlights the mental impact of the constant stream of content related to being Black in America. Specifically, she analyzes the psychological impact of growing up in the age of social media, where the graphic, everyday violence inflicted upon African American men, women, and children is only a click away.

While this seems no different from generations past, parents no longer have the capability to shield their children from what they’re digesting, and therefore, internalizing. There…


Twenty-two days into the Black Lives Matter protests, I can’t help but to think: Would this multiracial and intergenerational uprising exist if we weren’t in a pandemic?

Vanity Fair Archives, September 1998.

I know it’s a crazy thought, but hear me out. Black Lives Matter was created in 2013, and yet seven years later, Black people are still being murdered on tape by police officers, and very little has been done to enact meaningful reform in the US’s criminal justice system. Sure, we’ve made progress, but for the past few years, it’s felt as if we’ve been shouting Black Lives Matter into a white void.


I launched E∙NOUGH , a social activist clothing company, in 2018 because I wanted the ability to protest in my own way. I wanted to feel comfortable engaging in social issues that were important to myself, my family, and my friends. As a Black woman, I’ve always been conscious of saying the right thing, or being loud enough to garner attention, but not to draw too much attention. Everything has always been carefully scripted to make myself non-threatening. The sizing and placement of our slogans weren’t a design flaw; they were created to be bold enough without crossing over that…

Alexis C. Crews

Politico. Activist. Designer. https://www.mereprotest.co/about

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